“I wish I could go to bed”

14 02 2014

This came in via Medscape, which a Medical Education/Newsportal most of us subscribe to. It’s a compilation of reflections from the Medscape panel on “Why we practice Medicine”

If you have a subscription, you can see the rest of the slides here.





Med school has ended

7 02 2014

That is an ironic thing to say considering how the title of this blog is medschneverends. Yet, today, I just finished my final end of rotation test and hung out with my group mates for a final post-test outing. I’m a very nostalgic kind of guy and thought about how I went from my first day with a stethoscope where I was convinced that all the heart sounds heard from a stethoscope were make believe to the stage where you listen to a patients chest and start making some inferences as to why the heart sounds the way it does and what treatment you can offer the patient.

It’s a long hard journey that would not have been possible without some lovely friends, patient mentors, my parents who have been very enabling and multitudes of willing patients who were kind enough to let me listen to their chest multiple times without complaining. This goes for the entire spectrum of clinical skills I’ve started acquiring and refining over the past three years.

It’s time to settle down and prep for the finals and on the bright side, it would mean some time to really digest all those years of learning and just maybe, I’ll be able to a bit of writing on the side too.

Cheers to many years of learning ahead!





Every Pre-Med should read this

15 10 2013

While at the infinity pool at school, I had this discussion with my friend about what the philosophical basis of Medicine is. What exactly is Disease and how do or can we know for sure? There are no easy answers to that, though I get the inclination that the boundaries of the question and the lenses we use to look at it, change slightly depending on the problem at hand. I went around looking for answers and discovered that there is an entire field called the Philosophy of Medicine. I bumped into an article at the Internet Encyclopedia of Medicine discussing these perspectives. I felt that it gives a good overview on the theory and practise of Medicine and the fact that I am now more familiar with the subject, it is easier to understand the philosophical jargon. I feel that the article gave me a better philosophical foundation to understand both the evolution of ideas in Medicine and added some colour and structure to thinking about the field. I’m planning to read around the subject, with more content to come!





Books : The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

9 09 2013

 

 

Cover

The National Library had this “mystery brown bag” scheme where you go to the book counter and pick out a small brown bag from a tray of bags and read the mystery book in it. I cheated. The first few books were some sappy romance novels so I kept putting them back until I chanced on this one.

Originally titled “Men who hate Women” I found Stieg Larsson’s thriller a little slow at the beginning. I had heard mixed reviews from different people. One friend hated it and stopped reading while another one was raving about it. It was dark, though once you get over the early part of it, you get a little desensitised and focus on the thriller/suspense aspect of it. I was also goaded on by Phillip Pullman’s endorsement on the cover so although I put the physical book down for almost a week, I looked up the library’s online service and borrowed the digital version (the Trilogy) to read on my iPad.

On one hand, it has a multi-layered complex plot, however, I did find myself questioning the plausibility of it sometimes especially with regards to the unlimited technological capacity of the protagonist. Nonetheless, this was a great read and I would highly recommend it to anyone who can stomach the dark themes. The universe also surprised me when I bumped into a Ms Salander later in the week 😉

Next up, I recently finished reading Subhas Anandan’s Autobiography.





#archive The 3 Secrets of Highly Successful Graduates

31 08 2013

This is a really interesting piece of career advice I bumped int on Facebook.





On Liposuction …

29 08 2013

On Liposuction – Removal of abdominal adipose tissue with liposuction does not improve insulin sensitivity or risk factors for coronary heart disease, suggesting that the negative energy balance induced by diet and exercise are necessary for achieving the metabolic benefits of weight loss – Klein S et al, Absence of an effect of liposuction on insulin action and risk factors for coronary heart disease. N Engl J Med. 2004;350(25):2549

There you go. Read the rest of the paper here. Via UpToDate





#archive Healthcare spending may reach 3.5% of GDP in 2030

10 08 2013

This is the one article that talks about how much of it’s GDP Singapore spends on healthcare. Granted that we have “better outcomes”, I am not sure if we should be spending only 1.6% while we spend 24% on Defence.

He said Singapore is currently spending about 1.6 per cent of the GDP on healthcare.

By 2016, it would go up to two per cent of GDP and by 2030 when the rapidly ageing population will be the biggest driver of rising expenditure going forward, healthcare spending may reach around 3.5 per cent of GDP, taking into account demographic changes and higher medical inflation.

Mr Tharman stressed that Singapore should focus on achieving international standards for healthcare outcomes rather than simply on increasing spending.